twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:
SHEETS
photographed by Rinko Kawauchi
210 x 14o mm
hardcover / 152 pages / color
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
7,140 yen

twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2014:

SHEETS

photographed by Rinko Kawauchi

210 x 14o mm

hardcover / 152 pages / color

published by KOMINEK BOOKS

7,140 yen

danielaugschoell:

Pekka Turunen, from the series Against the Wall, 1984-1995
danielaugschoell:

Pekka Turunen, from the series Against the Wall, 1984-1995
danielaugschoell:

Pekka Turunen, from the series Against the Wall, 1984-1995
danielaugschoell:

Pekka Turunen, from the series Against the Wall, 1984-1995
danielaugschoell:

Pekka Turunen, from the series Against the Wall, 1984-1995

danielaugschoell:

Pekka Turunen, from the series Against the Wall, 1984-1995

Rinko Kawauchi, Sheets

oneyearofbooks:

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Published by Kominek, 2013

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heart !

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twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen
twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:
STRANGERS IN PARADISE
photographed by Misha Kominek
340 x 435 mm
softcover / 56 pages / color
limited edition of  500 copies
published by KOMINEK BOOKS
5,460 yen

twelvebooks:

twelvebooks distribution list 2013:

STRANGERS IN PARADISE

photographed by Misha Kominek

340 x 435 mm

softcover / 56 pages / color

limited edition of  500 copies

published by KOMINEK BOOKS

5,460 yen

Misha Kominek, First journey home

oneyearofbooks:

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Published 2013 by Kominek books, bought at Le Bal books. It’s a signed copy.

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disturber-magazine:

Rinko Kawauchi SHEETS
New Publication - Kominek books


Kominek Books 2013 /
21 cm x 14 cm /
152 pages / 12 gate fold outs/
hardcover /


Sheets attempts to retrace Rinko Kawauchi’s steps in this world through a reassembly and re-editing of her filmstrips as a reinvented whole. Cinematographic at heart, the sequences of randomly selected contact sheets offer a real-life time lapse, a resurrection of moments in the personal history of the artist and immortalised in some of her more significant publications.The book’s gatefolds mark intervals in this rhythmic crescendo. They contribute, as if under a magnifying glass, to new spontaneous pairings of images. It is all here, fragment by fragment, the elements and patterns of a primal cosmogony of varied affective nuances with their connotations of transcendental immanence—a palimpsest of the everyday that Kawauchi brings together with such astounding ease as if the flow of juxtaposing images were as natural to her as her own biological path in life. 

Friday 15th of november at 5pm Rinko Kawauchi signing her new book.



The book is available for pre-order, shipping starts 29 of november. First available copies at Offprint Paris,14th - 18th of november

disturber-magazine:

Rinko Kawauchi SHEETS
New Publication - Kominek books


Kominek Books 2013 /
21 cm x 14 cm /
152 pages / 12 gate fold outs/
hardcover /


Sheets attempts to retrace Rinko Kawauchi’s steps in this world through a reassembly and re-editing of her filmstrips as a reinvented whole. Cinematographic at heart, the sequences of randomly selected contact sheets offer a real-life time lapse, a resurrection of moments in the personal history of the artist and immortalised in some of her more significant publications.The book’s gatefolds mark intervals in this rhythmic crescendo. They contribute, as if under a magnifying glass, to new spontaneous pairings of images. It is all here, fragment by fragment, the elements and patterns of a primal cosmogony of varied affective nuances with their connotations of transcendental immanence—a palimpsest of the everyday that Kawauchi brings together with such astounding ease as if the flow of juxtaposing images were as natural to her as her own biological path in life. 

Friday 15th of november at 5pm Rinko Kawauchi signing her new book.



The book is available for pre-order, shipping starts 29 of november. First available copies at Offprint Paris,14th - 18th of november

disturber-magazine:

Rinko Kawauchi SHEETS

New Publication - Kominek books

image
Kominek Books 2013 /
21 cm x 14 cm /
152 pages / 12 gate fold outs/
hardcover /
Sheets attempts to retrace Rinko Kawauchi’s steps in this world through a reassembly and re-editing of her filmstrips as a reinvented whole. Cinematographic at heart, the sequences of randomly selected contact sheets offer a real-life time lapse, a resurrection of moments in the personal history of the artist and immortalised in some of her more significant publications.

The book’s gatefolds mark intervals in this rhythmic crescendo. They contribute, as if under a magnifying glass, to new spontaneous pairings of images. It is all here, fragment by fragment, the elements and patterns of a primal cosmogony of varied affective nuances with their connotations of transcendental immanence—a palimpsest of the everyday that Kawauchi brings together with such astounding ease as if the flow of juxtaposing images were as natural to her as her own biological path in life. 
Friday 15th of november at 5pm Rinko Kawauchi signing her new book.
The book is available for pre-order, shipping starts 29 of november. First available copies at Offprint Paris,14th - 18th of november

the-new-frame-dot-com:

Stumbled upon a great deal from Kominek Books.  If you preorder both these books before September 15th 2013, you get them both for 60euro + free shipping!  
I think that’s pretty awesome, and I’m looking forward to getting my copies. :)

In the bundle is First Journey Home + Strangers in Paradise, both photographed by Misha Kominek in late 90’s Europe.  

About First Journey Home, from the publisher “In the summer of 1997, Misha Kominek decided to go on a road trip by himself around Poland for the first time. He had just graduated from photography school in Barcelona and felt confident with his camera. Aside from family visits to his grandmother after the fall of communism in 1989, he had never been back to his homeland on his own since he emigrated to Germany at the age of twelve with his family in 1982. This book brings together some of the pictures taken during this first journey back home. It recalls permanent emotions and fleeting sensations alongside the bits and pieces of daily life. The photographer visited fruit markets, fields and villages, old historical places and unfamiliar cities, from his hometown of Gliwice to Auschwitz and Warsaw. He took pictures of the familiar and unfamiliar, attempting to track down forgotten friends, unearth hidden childhood memories and forge new emotions and illusions. In all, he was trying to determine how he would have felt if he had never left his country and how life would be if he stayed in Poland now that turning back was once again an option. First Journey Home is a tale about a man’s romantic return to his homeland, the garden of his childhood. It is a captivating homage to that very mellow moment of excitement that saw him off and has motivated him to keep up with photography ever since. Above all, it is about the journey itself and the wistful longing, the passionate yet futile willingness to recover one’s former innocence through insignificant things and black-and-white pictures. Imbued with a great amount of humor and irony, this intimate confession of youthful illusions under the summer heat provides a lasting statement on the everlasting fable of emigration in Europe and the craving for a sweet life.”

About Strangers in Paradise, from the publisher ”Strangers in Paradise is about the beaches, attractions and sunburnt pilgrims of Lloret de Mar, the Costa Brava’s most famous holiday resort. It is also about the long summer of 1998 and young photographer Misha Kominek’s encounter with one of his major childhood fantasies. By the late 1990s, Lloret de Mar had developed a reputation as a holiday paradise for Central and Eastern European tourists eager for beach and sun. Long before the advent of low-cost air travel, this small but densely constructed coastal town in northern Catalonia became the target destination for young, penniless couples in love, teenagers celebrating their graduation from school, single men seeking amorous adventures and large families looking for affordable vacations. While Russians—currently Lloret’s most wealthy visiting community—predominate today, it used to be filled with Germans from the former East Germany, Czechs, Poles and many others. They would endure an infernal two to three-day trip by car or coach through a multitude of international borders, languages and currencies just to savor their small spot in heaven… 

Strangers in Paradise consists of recollections of that moment of conclusion and reunion, the reunion of a wandering outsider with his own people in utopia, the discovery of the missing parts of his identity, its completion and the sweet acceptance of strangeness. Far from being anchored in clichés, this book offers a revealing insight of what lies beneath tourism, globalization, souvenirs and folklore. In lyrical terms, the photographer exposes the tender innocence and sheer, ecstatic beauty of northern…”

Check out the Gallery store, or follow this link to the offer and be sure to get in before September 15th :)  

Link to First Journey Home (separate from bundle)

Link to Strangers in Paradise (separate from bundle)

Link to Bundle Offer

timelightbox:

Photograph by Alec Soth—Courtesy Kominek Books

On Valentine’s Day, enjoy work from Alec Soth’s book Looking for Love.

The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova
2013 / English / 1100 copies
New anual publication of The Sochi Project
200 mm x 270 mm / 352 pp + 32 pp. insert / 105 Colour Photographs / Signed copy/ Shipping Starts on the 5th of february /
buy it at : Kominek books
The book will be first time presented at :
The Düsseldorf Photobook Salon, 1 till 3 of february 2013.
https://www.facebook.com/events/287010581419053/
http://www.duesseldorfphotoweekend.de/
***
Khava Gaisanova lives in Chermen, a village in the heart of the North Caucasus. In 2007 her husband disappeared, like so many men in the North Caucasus disappear without a trace – kidnapped, arrested or simply executed and buried in anonymous graves.  Writer Arnold van Bruggen and photographer Rob Hornstra met her by chance and became intrigued by her story, which is drenched with blood but punctuated by the will to survive. Hornstra and Van Bruggen then came to the attention of the security forces, who ultimately prevented them from travelling through the region. Even the strong Khava was intimidated and her family has avoided all contact since. Khava’s history reads like the history of the North Caucasus itself.  Hornstra and Van Bruggen have visited the North Caucasus numerous times between 2009 and 2012. They too became victims of the violence, corruption and abuse of power that have plagued the region for centuries. This book is a penetrating account of their travels.
 Since 2009, Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have mapped the region around Olympic Sochi on their website www.thesochiproject.org. The unstable North Caucasus described in this book lies on the other side of the mountains from Sochi. In The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova, a grim picture unfolds of the region hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics. The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova
2013 / English / 1100 copies
New anual publication of The Sochi Project
200 mm x 270 mm / 352 pp + 32 pp. insert / 105 Colour Photographs / Signed copy/ Shipping Starts on the 5th of february /
buy it at : Kominek books
The book will be first time presented at :
The Düsseldorf Photobook Salon, 1 till 3 of february 2013.
https://www.facebook.com/events/287010581419053/
http://www.duesseldorfphotoweekend.de/
***
Khava Gaisanova lives in Chermen, a village in the heart of the North Caucasus. In 2007 her husband disappeared, like so many men in the North Caucasus disappear without a trace – kidnapped, arrested or simply executed and buried in anonymous graves.  Writer Arnold van Bruggen and photographer Rob Hornstra met her by chance and became intrigued by her story, which is drenched with blood but punctuated by the will to survive. Hornstra and Van Bruggen then came to the attention of the security forces, who ultimately prevented them from travelling through the region. Even the strong Khava was intimidated and her family has avoided all contact since. Khava’s history reads like the history of the North Caucasus itself.  Hornstra and Van Bruggen have visited the North Caucasus numerous times between 2009 and 2012. They too became victims of the violence, corruption and abuse of power that have plagued the region for centuries. This book is a penetrating account of their travels.
 Since 2009, Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have mapped the region around Olympic Sochi on their website www.thesochiproject.org. The unstable North Caucasus described in this book lies on the other side of the mountains from Sochi. In The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova, a grim picture unfolds of the region hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics. The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova
2013 / English / 1100 copies
New anual publication of The Sochi Project
200 mm x 270 mm / 352 pp + 32 pp. insert / 105 Colour Photographs / Signed copy/ Shipping Starts on the 5th of february /
buy it at : Kominek books
The book will be first time presented at :
The Düsseldorf Photobook Salon, 1 till 3 of february 2013.
https://www.facebook.com/events/287010581419053/
http://www.duesseldorfphotoweekend.de/
***
Khava Gaisanova lives in Chermen, a village in the heart of the North Caucasus. In 2007 her husband disappeared, like so many men in the North Caucasus disappear without a trace – kidnapped, arrested or simply executed and buried in anonymous graves.  Writer Arnold van Bruggen and photographer Rob Hornstra met her by chance and became intrigued by her story, which is drenched with blood but punctuated by the will to survive. Hornstra and Van Bruggen then came to the attention of the security forces, who ultimately prevented them from travelling through the region. Even the strong Khava was intimidated and her family has avoided all contact since. Khava’s history reads like the history of the North Caucasus itself.  Hornstra and Van Bruggen have visited the North Caucasus numerous times between 2009 and 2012. They too became victims of the violence, corruption and abuse of power that have plagued the region for centuries. This book is a penetrating account of their travels.
 Since 2009, Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have mapped the region around Olympic Sochi on their website www.thesochiproject.org. The unstable North Caucasus described in this book lies on the other side of the mountains from Sochi. In The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova, a grim picture unfolds of the region hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics. The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova
2013 / English / 1100 copies
New anual publication of The Sochi Project
200 mm x 270 mm / 352 pp + 32 pp. insert / 105 Colour Photographs / Signed copy/ Shipping Starts on the 5th of february /
buy it at : Kominek books
The book will be first time presented at :
The Düsseldorf Photobook Salon, 1 till 3 of february 2013.
https://www.facebook.com/events/287010581419053/
http://www.duesseldorfphotoweekend.de/
***
Khava Gaisanova lives in Chermen, a village in the heart of the North Caucasus. In 2007 her husband disappeared, like so many men in the North Caucasus disappear without a trace – kidnapped, arrested or simply executed and buried in anonymous graves.  Writer Arnold van Bruggen and photographer Rob Hornstra met her by chance and became intrigued by her story, which is drenched with blood but punctuated by the will to survive. Hornstra and Van Bruggen then came to the attention of the security forces, who ultimately prevented them from travelling through the region. Even the strong Khava was intimidated and her family has avoided all contact since. Khava’s history reads like the history of the North Caucasus itself.  Hornstra and Van Bruggen have visited the North Caucasus numerous times between 2009 and 2012. They too became victims of the violence, corruption and abuse of power that have plagued the region for centuries. This book is a penetrating account of their travels.
 Since 2009, Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have mapped the region around Olympic Sochi on their website www.thesochiproject.org. The unstable North Caucasus described in this book lies on the other side of the mountains from Sochi. In The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova, a grim picture unfolds of the region hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics. The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova
2013 / English / 1100 copies
New anual publication of The Sochi Project
200 mm x 270 mm / 352 pp + 32 pp. insert / 105 Colour Photographs / Signed copy/ Shipping Starts on the 5th of february /
buy it at : Kominek books
The book will be first time presented at :
The Düsseldorf Photobook Salon, 1 till 3 of february 2013.
https://www.facebook.com/events/287010581419053/
http://www.duesseldorfphotoweekend.de/
***
Khava Gaisanova lives in Chermen, a village in the heart of the North Caucasus. In 2007 her husband disappeared, like so many men in the North Caucasus disappear without a trace – kidnapped, arrested or simply executed and buried in anonymous graves.  Writer Arnold van Bruggen and photographer Rob Hornstra met her by chance and became intrigued by her story, which is drenched with blood but punctuated by the will to survive. Hornstra and Van Bruggen then came to the attention of the security forces, who ultimately prevented them from travelling through the region. Even the strong Khava was intimidated and her family has avoided all contact since. Khava’s history reads like the history of the North Caucasus itself.  Hornstra and Van Bruggen have visited the North Caucasus numerous times between 2009 and 2012. They too became victims of the violence, corruption and abuse of power that have plagued the region for centuries. This book is a penetrating account of their travels.
 Since 2009, Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have mapped the region around Olympic Sochi on their website www.thesochiproject.org. The unstable North Caucasus described in this book lies on the other side of the mountains from Sochi. In The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova, a grim picture unfolds of the region hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics. The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova
2013 / English / 1100 copies
New anual publication of The Sochi Project
200 mm x 270 mm / 352 pp + 32 pp. insert / 105 Colour Photographs / Signed copy/ Shipping Starts on the 5th of february /
buy it at : Kominek books
The book will be first time presented at :
The Düsseldorf Photobook Salon, 1 till 3 of february 2013.
https://www.facebook.com/events/287010581419053/
http://www.duesseldorfphotoweekend.de/
***
Khava Gaisanova lives in Chermen, a village in the heart of the North Caucasus. In 2007 her husband disappeared, like so many men in the North Caucasus disappear without a trace – kidnapped, arrested or simply executed and buried in anonymous graves.  Writer Arnold van Bruggen and photographer Rob Hornstra met her by chance and became intrigued by her story, which is drenched with blood but punctuated by the will to survive. Hornstra and Van Bruggen then came to the attention of the security forces, who ultimately prevented them from travelling through the region. Even the strong Khava was intimidated and her family has avoided all contact since. Khava’s history reads like the history of the North Caucasus itself.  Hornstra and Van Bruggen have visited the North Caucasus numerous times between 2009 and 2012. They too became victims of the violence, corruption and abuse of power that have plagued the region for centuries. This book is a penetrating account of their travels.
 Since 2009, Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have mapped the region around Olympic Sochi on their website www.thesochiproject.org. The unstable North Caucasus described in this book lies on the other side of the mountains from Sochi. In The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova, a grim picture unfolds of the region hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics. The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova
2013 / English / 1100 copies
New anual publication of The Sochi Project
200 mm x 270 mm / 352 pp + 32 pp. insert / 105 Colour Photographs / Signed copy/ Shipping Starts on the 5th of february /
buy it at : Kominek books
The book will be first time presented at :
The Düsseldorf Photobook Salon, 1 till 3 of february 2013.
https://www.facebook.com/events/287010581419053/
http://www.duesseldorfphotoweekend.de/
***
Khava Gaisanova lives in Chermen, a village in the heart of the North Caucasus. In 2007 her husband disappeared, like so many men in the North Caucasus disappear without a trace – kidnapped, arrested or simply executed and buried in anonymous graves.  Writer Arnold van Bruggen and photographer Rob Hornstra met her by chance and became intrigued by her story, which is drenched with blood but punctuated by the will to survive. Hornstra and Van Bruggen then came to the attention of the security forces, who ultimately prevented them from travelling through the region. Even the strong Khava was intimidated and her family has avoided all contact since. Khava’s history reads like the history of the North Caucasus itself.  Hornstra and Van Bruggen have visited the North Caucasus numerous times between 2009 and 2012. They too became victims of the violence, corruption and abuse of power that have plagued the region for centuries. This book is a penetrating account of their travels.
 Since 2009, Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have mapped the region around Olympic Sochi on their website www.thesochiproject.org. The unstable North Caucasus described in this book lies on the other side of the mountains from Sochi. In The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova, a grim picture unfolds of the region hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics.

The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova

2013 / English / 1100 copies
New anual publication of The Sochi Project

200 mm x 270 mm / 352 pp + 32 pp. insert / 105 Colour Photographs / Signed copy/ Shipping Starts on the 5th of february /

buy it at : Kominek books


The book will be first time presented at :

The Düsseldorf Photobook Salon, 1 till 3 of february 2013.

https://www.facebook.com/events/287010581419053/

http://www.duesseldorfphotoweekend.de/

***

Khava Gaisanova lives in Chermen, a village in the heart of the North Caucasus. In 2007 her husband disappeared, like so many men in the North Caucasus disappear without a trace – kidnapped, arrested or simply executed and buried in anonymous graves.

Writer Arnold van Bruggen and photographer Rob Hornstra met her by chance and became intrigued by her story, which is drenched with blood but punctuated by the will to survive. Hornstra and Van Bruggen then came to the attention of the security forces, who ultimately prevented them from travelling through the region. Even the strong Khava was intimidated and her family has avoided all contact since. Khava’s history reads like the history of the North Caucasus itself.

Hornstra and Van Bruggen have visited the North Caucasus numerous times between 2009 and 2012. They too became victims of the violence, corruption and abuse of power that have plagued the region for centuries. This book is a penetrating account of their travels.


Since 2009, Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have mapped the region around Olympic Sochi on their website www.thesochiproject.org. The unstable North Caucasus described in this book lies on the other side of the mountains from Sochi. In The Secret History of Khava Gaisanova, a grim picture unfolds of the region hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics.

one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM ) one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books
2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/
In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.

Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians.  While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape.   While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams. 
( Publishers Note LBM )

one of our favourite books of 2012 available at Kominek Books

2012/Little Big Man/ Edition of 450 Copies/Hardbound within a linen display case/3 different covers/122 Full Color Plates/Multiple Gatefolds/ Vellum Inserts/32x30cm/ Additional booklet with Janapease and english text/

In the fall of 1990, Keizo Kitajima received a commission from Japan’s Asahi Shimbun newspaper to visit the Soviet Union, the opportunity to spend a year documenting both people and places in what was then a monolithic entity. 15 republics, 11 time zones, and thousands of miles spanning the two—the task was daunting in the very least. Having spent several years based in West Berlin, the Iron Curtain was a looming presence and Kitajima had often contemplated turning his lens towards the Soviet regime although the difficulties associated therein—censorship, freedom of access, and overwhelming bureaucracy—seemed insurmountable. And so it was, with a mix of anticipation and trepidation, that Kitajima entered the USSR in November 1990 to capture a moment in time where the winds of change roared at a howling pace.



Through Glasnost and Perestroika, reforms ushered in by Mikhail Gorbachev, the media—both foreign and domestic— was granted far more access than ever before to Soviet society. In light of his major commission from an established media outlet, Kitajima found the perfect salve for his concerns about undertaking such a monumental endeavor. Having been granted unparalleled access to people and places usually off-limits to regular citizens,USSR 1991 can be regarded as the final photographic archive and overview of Soviet life. Throughout the process, Kitajima’s camera was omnivorous, digesting society as he saw it. KGB mandarins sit cheek by jowl with pop singers, artists alongside activists, peasants next to politicians. 
While much of the outside world’s opinion of the USSR at that point was of a mighty power constrained—images of dour citizens queuing for bread made nightly newscasts worldwide—Kitajima resolved to avoid conforming to both “Western Humanist” ideology (wherein the chaos and ugliness of the regime was represented in stark contrast to Western affluence) and also to falling prey to state propaganda depicting happy laborers, and stalwart soldiers. With these competing perspectives, Kitajima focussed on people and landscapes, or more often, people in their own landscape. 

While Kitajima’s is often known for its high contrast black and white photography,USSR 1991 differs greatly as it was photographed with the now defunct Kodacrome slide film, and offers a stunning, painterly account of his travels. Kitajima’s artfulness is ever present—this is not formulaic documentarian photography, or front line correspondence from a hard-boiled photojournalist. Here there are hard shadows from flash bulbs and a vivid technicolor applied to a part of the world that was often perceived as dark, grey and grim. While there are de-rigeur ruins of industry, giant colorless stacks whose purpose is never clear from afar, they sit in stark contrast to vivid blue skies. Peasants in multicolor prints gaze to the distance, religious activists swathe their faces in bright red scarfs. It’s not all grim here either: fashion models pose in bikinis, teenagers sunbathe, and actors mug for the camera. USSR 1991 can, in some ways, be seen as an antecedent to August Sander’s People of the 20th Century (Menschen des 20. Jahrhunderts). Here, Kitajima also captures a nation (or in this case, nations) and its people in a time of upheaval, all the while maintaining a level of open objectivity. With its images of protestors, dissidents, and obstructionists, hindsight reveals that USSR 1991 is an engrossing and encompassing portrait an empire unraveling at the seams.

( Publishers Note LBM )

Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:
 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree
"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers
"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection
"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist
"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books
"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books
"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books
"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab
"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books
"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook

Komineks top 10 photo books of 2012 in no particular order:

 ”Noray” Juan Valbuena, selfpublished/phree

"Heaven" Paul Kooiker, Van Zoetendaal Publishers

"touch" Peter Dekens,, The Eriskay Connection

"Rien" André Cepeda, Pierre von Kleist

"USSR 1991" Keizo Kitajima, Little Big Man books

"Cette Montagne Cest Moi" Witho Worms, FW books

"Down these MEAN Streets" will Steacy, b frank books

"Found photos in Detroit" Arianna Arcara & Luca Santese, Cesuralab

"Deutschland" Gerry Johansson, Mack books

"The Americans List", Jason Eskenazi, selfpublished/redhook

littlebrownmushroom:

Thanks to everyone who named Looking For Love, 1996 one of their favorite photobooks of the year:
New York Times
The Guardian
Matthew P. Carson (International Center of Photography)
Shannon Michael Cane (Printed Matter)
Adam Bell
Shane Lavalette
Aaron Schuman
atsushisaito.blog
Photobookstore.co.uk
Never More
yoshikatsufujii
Maja Forsslund AKT
Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012 Maja Forsslund AKT
Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012 Maja Forsslund AKT
Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012 Maja Forsslund AKT
Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012 Maja Forsslund AKT
Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012 Maja Forsslund AKT
Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012 Maja Forsslund AKT
Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012 Maja Forsslund AKT
Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012

Maja Forsslund AKT

Kominek Gallery is pleased to present a solo show by Maja Forsslund (*1975 in Stockholm) as part of the European Month of Photography in Berlin.

Opening October, 20th 2012, 6 p.m.
Exhibition October, 23rd - November, 16th 2012

The history of mankind is rife with love producing illogical and oddball behavior. Alec Soth’s newest book Looking for Love, 1996 is, in its way, about the search for love guided by the heart and the search of love guided by the eye.